Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Goat Gate and Coops...

Well I was able to get the goat gate "built" today. We pretty much just removed 3 boards from a big pallet and added chicken wire and hinges. It is a heavy gate, and was probably the most heavy duty pallet I have ever seen. It was constructed of 7 2x6s nailed to 4 cross sections of landscaping timbers that were essentially 4x4s. We just have to hang it now, but the drill battery died and I think we need a wheel for it to roll on since it is so heavy. Other than hanging the gate the new pen is done except for the need to remove some oak seedlings and low-hanging branches (since something I read says that oak leaves can be toxic to goats).

Today on craigslist there was a posting for 20 free chickens (the woman had to move and couldn't take them with her). I am brainstorming trying to decide whether or not I can throw together a coop of some sort in the next day or two...

Oh by the way, that book I read, Coop by Michael Perry, was pretty good. It had some sad moments, but overall pretty good. It did remind me a little bit of See You In a Hundred Years by Logan Ward; mainly because they both tried something for a year and then decided they didn't really want to go all out like they had tried. Both were good reads though and Perry's was almost a memoir of sorts mixed in with his year of experience with pigs, chickens, and kids...

I also took some pictures of the goats, dogs, and cat today; I'll get them up in a day or two.

2 comments:

  1. I really hope you are able to get those chickens. Getting full grown ones would be so much easier than getting hatchlings, as the hatchlings are easy targets for every predator due to both their size and lack of sense. Plus those are free!

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  2. Goats can't eat 'wilted' oak leaves (thought they love them). Same with cherry. But fresh (on the branch) and completely dry oak leaves are fine for them. They actually may help with worms since they are high in tannins. So you don't need to remove the seedlings. They will probably keep them so eaten down that you won't even have to worry about them in the fall.

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Thanks for taking the time to comment! I really appreciate the input and will do my best to respond quickly if need be. Thanks again for reading!

Yours Truly,
The Crowsons